This tasty treat in your purse can kill your dog, vet warns

Share Story

You might want to “paws” what you’re doing and hear this doc out.

A Kentucky-based veterinarian is warning dog owners about the dangers of sugar-free gum in a recently resurfaced video, warning that it can be fatal to your pup if somehow ingested.

Dr. Matt McGlasson took to TikTok to share the tip, explaining that it’s really the sugar substitute xylitol found in the gum that is extremely dangerous for dogs.

“Just one piece of gum could be fatal to your puppy,” McGlasson wrote in white text on the video, which featured a montage of him taking care of different puppies.

“Keep your furbabies safe!” he continued. “No gum for puppies!”

Xylitol, originally found in birch bark, is included in a class of sugar known as a sugar alcohol, according to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.


Dr. Matt McGlasson took to TikTok explain why  the sugar substitute xylitol found in the gum that is extremely dangerous for dogs.
Dr. Matt McGlasson took to TikTok explain why the sugar substitute xylitol found in the gum that is extremely dangerous for dogs.
TikTok/dr.mattmcglasson

The ingredient can cause a dangerous spike in insulin for dogs.
The ingredient can cause a dangerous spike in insulin for dogs.
TikTok/dr.mattmcglasson

It is typically used as a sugar substitute for sugar-free items, like chocolate, in order for manufacturers to produce that sweet taste without using the real stuff.

But it is absorbed differently in humans than it is in dogs — when we ingest it, the sugar alcohol does not “stimulate the release of insulin from the pancreas,” according to The FDA, but it is extremely harmful to pups because it is quickly absorbed in their bloodstreams, and can result in a “potent” release of insulin into their pancreas.

“Xylitol can cause life-threatening hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) in dogs,” McGlasson told The Post, urging pet owners to “go to the vet immediately” if they think their dog has ingested a food item with Xylitol in it.

Some tell-tale signs that your dog may have ingested Xylitol include “lethargy, weakness, vomiting, collapse, seizures,” said McGlasson.

However, it can be reversed at an animal hospital with an I.V. dose of sugar (dextrose), according to the ASPCA.


"Just one piece of gum could be fatal to your puppy," McGlasson wrote in the video.
“Just one piece of gum could be fatal to your puppy,” McGlasson wrote in the video.
Jeffrey Greenberg/Universal Images Group via Getty Images

The ingredient is safe for humans, but not for dogs.
The ingredient is safe for humans, but not for dogs.
TikTok/dr.mattmcglasson

Xylitol is often used as a sugar substitute in sugar-free products.
Xylitol is often used as a sugar substitute in sugar-free products.
TikTok/dr.mattmcglasson

It’s also important to be aware that sugar-free gum isn’t the only food item that may contain Xylitol.

Breath mints, chewable vitamins, cough syrup, baked goods, and some peanut and nut butters can contain the ingredient, according to The FDA.

And, not only that, but Xylitol has the possibility of even causing liver damage in dogs, according to the ASPCA, because it can elevate their liver enzymes.


There are other food items that have Xylitol in them as well, like breath mints and some baked goods.
There are other food items that have Xylitol in them as well, like breath mints and some baked goods.
Getty Images/iStockphoto

The veterinarian urged users to "keep their furbabies safe."
The veterinarian urged users to “keep their furbabies safe.”
TikTok/dr.mattmcglasson

If the liver enzymes are only slightly elevated, it can be fixed with medicine, the organization reported, but larger ingestions of Xylitol have the potential to cause liver failure, which poses a larger problem for pups.

In other dog news, McGlasson isn’t the only one who has put out warnings about seemingly-innocent pet owner practices over the past few months.

Earlier this month, Dr. Anna Foreman, a veterinarian with UK’s Everypaw Pet Insurance, urged owners to stop dyeing their animals’ fur, because it can lead to skin irritation.

A British woman also issued a caution to dog owners after her fox red Labrador, Toby, choked to death during a game of fetch.

“It was devastating,” Toby’s owner, Emma Meen, shared about the experience to Kennedy News.

“It was like my whole world had come to an end because he was so good with me and so hardworking. He was like a child.”

Source link

Tags

Share Article

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

Related Posts

This is articles having same tags as the current post.

error: Content is protected !!